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Courses

Writing and Humanities

Creative Writing 8-9
In this course, students develop the imaginative, critical, and technical skills necessary for writing fiction and poetry. Using the published work of well-known authors as well as original student writing, students explore various topics and problems that face anyone embarking on the creative-writing process. Students read texts as writers, not as critics or historians of literature. Additionally, this class will examine the fundamental questions facing writers today: how and why do writers write? The course follows the workshop model where students bring their own stories and poems to class for group discussion, and students develop the skills to constructively critique and workshop each other's work. Through this process, students learn a variety of techniques for improving and developing their own writing. Handouts, in-class exercises, peer review, and individual conferences help students define and set goals for strengthening their writing. Each student will compile a portfolio of writing; some classes may also opt to create a compendium of student writings. Students may be given a variety of assignments, ranging from short, one-time writings to longer, more substantive pieces subject to multiple drafts and review. The course is taught by a range of instructors, including published authors, current or former recipients of Stanford's Wallace Stegner Fellowship for emerging writers, or other affiliated writing professionals.

Session 1 & 2

June 25 - July 14
July 17 - August 05

Age and grade requirements:

1. 8th - 9th grade at the time of application.
2. age 13 - 15 on the first day of the session.
Introduction to the Digital Humanities
The digital humanities are those pursuits which use computers, software, digital tools in general, to explore topics of humanistic inquiry. In order to have a more nuanced understanding of the digital humanities, students will be exposed to a number of its practices, and practitioners. Topics will include history of the digital humanities, textual studies, electronic literature, computational and new media, and emerging work around text, image, and new media curation and visualization. This course is organized as a mix of seminar and workshop and will be featuring a new platform, Lacuna, designed by a digital humanities team at Stanford. Lacuna Studies will also serve as a case study for examples of digital humanities projects. This class will also have a practical, hands-on element where students can try out the technologies and interfaces for humanistic inquiry discussed in the course. At the end of the course, students will not only have a better idea of what the digital humanities are, but will also be introduced to different ways they can be practiced, opening up possibilities for further exploration.

Session 1

June 25 - July 14

Prerequisite(s)

Completion of one year of English.

Age and grade requirements:

1. 9th - 11th grade at the time of application.
2. age 14 - 17 on the first day of the session.
Expository Writing 8-9
Ideal for motivated and verbally talented students with an interest in writing about ideas and social issues, the Expository Writing course introduces students to a variety of essay structures and modes of essay development. The course examines two different forms of writing side by side: creative non-fiction and analytical essays, and in doing so, students compare the use of personal and fictional material with analysis and criticism. In this course, students investigate examples of reflective personal essays, expository essays, and research-based arguments written by expert practitioners of the art of writing, in part to improve their writing skills but also learn to evaluate and analyze arguments more effectively and think more critically about the writing process. To this end, students participate in a variety of informal writing exercises as well as one longer research project, which allows them to experiment with several different types of essays, including those based upon textual analysis, personal experience, and research. The course presents a valuable opportunity for close work with a master writing teacher, skilled teaching assistants, and other young writers in a workshop atmosphere.

Session 1 & 2

June 25 - July 14
July 17 - August 05

Age and grade requirements:

1. 8th - 9th grade at the time of application.
2. age 13 - 15 on the first day of the session.
Expository Writing 10-11
Ideal for motivated and verbally talented students with an interest in writing about ideas and social issues, the Expository Writing course introduces students to a variety of essay structures and modes of essay development. The course examines two different forms of writing side by side: creative non-fiction and analytical essays, and in doing so, students compare the use of personal and fictional material with analysis and criticism. In this course, students investigate examples of reflective personal essays, expository essays, and research-based arguments written by expert practitioners of the art of writing, in part to improve their writing skills but also learn to evaluate and analyze arguments more effectively and think more critically about the writing process. To this end, students participate in a variety of informal writing exercises as well as one longer research project, which allows them to experiment with several different types of essays, including those based upon textual analysis, personal experience, and research. The course presents a valuable opportunity for close work with a master writing teacher, skilled teaching assistants, and other young writers in a workshop atmosphere.

Session 1 & 2

June 25 - July 14
July 17 - August 05

Age and grade requirements:

1. 10th - 11th grade at the time of application.
2. age 15 - 17 on the first day of the session.
Screenwriting
Writing scripts for film requires tools and abilities that cross disciplines: an eye for visual composition, an ear for dialogue, a mind for structure, and an insight into human behavior. Students in this course will progress from an introduction to the written screenplay, with its ability to evoke a world in an incredibly efficient format, through character sketches, scene writing, and outlines, to a final project of a short film script, or the beginning of a feature film script. The course will also analyze the structure of films using classic and current movies as guides, and include working a visit by a film professional as well as field trips to the Stanford Theater in Palo Alto and the San Francisco Film Society. Some experimentation with camera work and editing may also be possible. Throughout the course students will learn to give and take constructive criticism in a writing workshop, a crucial skill for the collaborative world of film.

Session 1

June 25 - July 14

Age and grade requirements:

1. 9th - 11th grade at the time of application.
2. age 14 - 17 on the first day of the session.
21st Century Humanities: Visions of the City in Cinema and Literature
The city has gained preeminence in our cultural imaginary: from the futuristic Tokyo of Akira to the whimsical urban landscapes of Italo Calvino's Invisible Cities. What is encoded in this fascination with urban space and in the forms of its representation in cinema and literature? As the world�s population becomes increasingly urban, and the city is increasingly tied to global networks of material and immaterial flows (of labor, commodities, finance, and images), urban space condenses a whole set of political, environmental, economic, technological, and cultural tensions. This reading- and writing-intensive class takes an interdisciplinary look at the way cinema and literature respond, through their specific formal and technical means, to the development of the global city. How does the interplay between text, image, and form in literary and cinematic representations of the city tell us about our emerging visions of the urban? This course brings together a wide range of literary and cinematic products and analyzes them through the lens of theoretical debates about globalization and urbanization, at the same time that it seeks to make sense of the way these artworks think about these processes. Students will engage with varied films and literature and up-to-date theoretical texts. In doing so they will gain a solid grounding in the formal analysis of literature and cinema, becoming attuned to the way the specific characteristics of each art form allow it to think about the world at large in unique ways. Additionally, students will develop the conceptual, interpretative, research, and writing skills and methodologies crucial for producing interdisciplinary work in the humanities.

Session 2

July 17 - August 05

Prerequisite(s)

Completion of one year of English.

Age and grade requirements:

1. 9th - 11th grade at the time of application.
2. age 14 - 17 on the first day of the session.
Creative Writing 10-11
In this course, students develop the imaginative, critical, and technical skills necessary for writing fiction and poetry. Using the published work of well-known authors as well as original student writing, students explore various topics and problems that face anyone embarking on the creative-writing process. Students read texts as writers, not as critics or historians of literature. Additionally, this class will examine the fundamental questions facing writers today: how and why do writers write? The course follows the workshop model where students bring their own stories and poems to class for group discussion, and students develop the skills to constructively critique and workshop each other's work. Through this process, students learn a variety of techniques for improving and developing their own writing. Handouts, in-class exercises, peer review, and individual conferences help students define and set goals for strengthening their writing. Each student will compile a portfolio of writing; some classes may also opt to create a compendium of student writings. Students may be given a variety of assignments, ranging from short, one-time writings to longer, more substantive pieces subject to multiple drafts and review. The course is taught by a range of instructors, including published authors, current or former recipients of Stanford's Wallace Stegner Fellowship for emerging writers, or other affiliated writing professionals.

Session 1 & 2

June 25 - July 14
July 17 - August 05

Age and grade requirements:

1. 10th - 11th grade at the time of application.
2. age 15 - 17 on the first day of the session.
Film Production
This course is a hands-on exploration of the key elements of film making, from the screenplay to the big screen. Over the course of three weeks, students will write their own short films and divide up into groups to produce those selected by the instructor. Films will be shot on DSLR cameras and edited in Final Cut Pro X. Each project will be structured like a professional film crew, with the opportunity for students to learn various roles on set, including director, cinematographer, editor, 1st AD, and acting. Their final projects will screen in a Summer Institutes Film Festival where their fellow students are invited to enjoy their work.

Session 2

July 17 - August 05

Age and grade requirements:

1. 9th - 11th grade at the time of application.
2. age 14 - 17 on the first day of the session.